Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes

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Standard

Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes. / Browning, Martin; Danø, Anne Møller; Heinesen, Eskil.

I: Health Economics, Bind 15, Nr. 10, 2006, s. 1061-1075.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Browning, M, Danø, AM & Heinesen, E 2006, 'Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes', Health Economics, bind 15, nr. 10, s. 1061-1075. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1101

APA

Browning, M., Danø, A. M., & Heinesen, E. (2006). Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes. Health Economics, 15(10), 1061-1075. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1101

Vancouver

Browning M, Danø AM, Heinesen E. Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes. Health Economics. 2006;15(10):1061-1075. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1101

Author

Browning, Martin ; Danø, Anne Møller ; Heinesen, Eskil. / Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes. I: Health Economics. 2006 ; Bind 15, Nr. 10. s. 1061-1075.

Bibtex

@article{25983be095b311dbbee902004c4f4f50,
title = "Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes",
abstract = "We investigate whether job loss as the result of displacement causes hospitalization for stress-related diseases which are widely thought to be associated with unemployment. In doing this, we use much better data than any previous investigators. Our data are a random 10{\%} sample of the male population of Denmark for the years 1981-1999 with full records on demographics, health and work status for each person, and with a link from every working person to a plant. We use the method of matching on observables to estimate the counter-factual of what would have happened to the health of a particular group of displaced workers if they had not in fact been displaced. Our results indicate unequivocally that being displaced in Denmark does not cause hospitalization for stress-related disease. An analysis of the power of our test suggests that even though we are looking for a relatively rare outcome, our data set is large enough to show even quite small an effect if there were any. Supplementary analyses do not show any causal link from displacement or unemployment to our health outcomes for particular groups that might be thought to be more susceptible",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, health production, Denmark",
author = "Martin Browning and Dan{\o}, {Anne M{\o}ller} and Eskil Heinesen",
note = "JEL Classification: I12, J63",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1002/hec.1101",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "1061--1075",
journal = "Health Economics",
issn = "1057-9230",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Job displacement and stress-related health outcomes

AU - Browning, Martin

AU - Danø, Anne Møller

AU - Heinesen, Eskil

N1 - JEL Classification: I12, J63

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - We investigate whether job loss as the result of displacement causes hospitalization for stress-related diseases which are widely thought to be associated with unemployment. In doing this, we use much better data than any previous investigators. Our data are a random 10% sample of the male population of Denmark for the years 1981-1999 with full records on demographics, health and work status for each person, and with a link from every working person to a plant. We use the method of matching on observables to estimate the counter-factual of what would have happened to the health of a particular group of displaced workers if they had not in fact been displaced. Our results indicate unequivocally that being displaced in Denmark does not cause hospitalization for stress-related disease. An analysis of the power of our test suggests that even though we are looking for a relatively rare outcome, our data set is large enough to show even quite small an effect if there were any. Supplementary analyses do not show any causal link from displacement or unemployment to our health outcomes for particular groups that might be thought to be more susceptible

AB - We investigate whether job loss as the result of displacement causes hospitalization for stress-related diseases which are widely thought to be associated with unemployment. In doing this, we use much better data than any previous investigators. Our data are a random 10% sample of the male population of Denmark for the years 1981-1999 with full records on demographics, health and work status for each person, and with a link from every working person to a plant. We use the method of matching on observables to estimate the counter-factual of what would have happened to the health of a particular group of displaced workers if they had not in fact been displaced. Our results indicate unequivocally that being displaced in Denmark does not cause hospitalization for stress-related disease. An analysis of the power of our test suggests that even though we are looking for a relatively rare outcome, our data set is large enough to show even quite small an effect if there were any. Supplementary analyses do not show any causal link from displacement or unemployment to our health outcomes for particular groups that might be thought to be more susceptible

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - health production

KW - Denmark

U2 - 10.1002/hec.1101

DO - 10.1002/hec.1101

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 1061

EP - 1075

JO - Health Economics

JF - Health Economics

SN - 1057-9230

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 321071