Children and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Denmark

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Children and Gender Inequality : Evidence from Denmark. / Kleven, Henrik; Landais, Camille; Søgaard, Jakob Egholt.

I: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, Bind 11, Nr. 4, 01.10.2019, s. 181-209.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kleven, H, Landais, C & Søgaard, JE 2019, 'Children and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Denmark', American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, bind 11, nr. 4, s. 181-209. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.20180010

APA

Kleven, H., Landais, C., & Søgaard, J. E. (2019). Children and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Denmark. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 11(4), 181-209. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.20180010

Vancouver

Kleven H, Landais C, Søgaard JE. Children and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Denmark. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. 2019 okt 1;11(4):181-209. https://doi.org/10.1257/app.20180010

Author

Kleven, Henrik ; Landais, Camille ; Søgaard, Jakob Egholt. / Children and Gender Inequality : Evidence from Denmark. I: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. 2019 ; Bind 11, Nr. 4. s. 181-209.

Bibtex

@article{640b66643470432f825d4827d2427a78,
title = "Children and Gender Inequality: Evidence from Denmark",
abstract = "Using Danish administrative data, we study the impacts of children on gender inequality in the labor market. The arrival of children creates a long-run gender gap in earnings of around 20 percent driven by hours worked, participation, and wage rates. We identify mechanisms driving these {"}child penalties{"} in terms of occupation, sector, and firm choices. We find that the fraction of gender inequality caused by child penalties has featured a dramatic increase over the last three to four decades. Finally, we show that child penalties are transmitted through generations, from parents to daughters, suggesting an influence of childhood environment on gender identity.",
author = "Henrik Kleven and Camille Landais and S{\o}gaard, {Jakob Egholt}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1257/app.20180010",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "181--209",
journal = "American Economic Journal: Applied Economics",
issn = "1945-7782",
publisher = "American Economic Association",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children and Gender Inequality

T2 - Evidence from Denmark

AU - Kleven, Henrik

AU - Landais, Camille

AU - Søgaard, Jakob Egholt

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Using Danish administrative data, we study the impacts of children on gender inequality in the labor market. The arrival of children creates a long-run gender gap in earnings of around 20 percent driven by hours worked, participation, and wage rates. We identify mechanisms driving these "child penalties" in terms of occupation, sector, and firm choices. We find that the fraction of gender inequality caused by child penalties has featured a dramatic increase over the last three to four decades. Finally, we show that child penalties are transmitted through generations, from parents to daughters, suggesting an influence of childhood environment on gender identity.

AB - Using Danish administrative data, we study the impacts of children on gender inequality in the labor market. The arrival of children creates a long-run gender gap in earnings of around 20 percent driven by hours worked, participation, and wage rates. We identify mechanisms driving these "child penalties" in terms of occupation, sector, and firm choices. We find that the fraction of gender inequality caused by child penalties has featured a dramatic increase over the last three to four decades. Finally, we show that child penalties are transmitted through generations, from parents to daughters, suggesting an influence of childhood environment on gender identity.

U2 - 10.1257/app.20180010

DO - 10.1257/app.20180010

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 181

EP - 209

JO - American Economic Journal: Applied Economics

JF - American Economic Journal: Applied Economics

SN - 1945-7782

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 228987526