Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

Standard

Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms. / Fadlon, Itzik; Lyngse, Frederik Plesner; Nielsen, Torben Heien.

I: SSRN Electronic Journal, 18.07.2022.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

Harvard

Fadlon, I, Lyngse, FP & Nielsen, TH 2022, 'Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms', SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3753154

APA

Fadlon, I., Lyngse, F. P., & Nielsen, T. H. (2022). Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms. SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3753154

Vancouver

Fadlon I, Lyngse FP, Nielsen TH. Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms. SSRN Electronic Journal. 2022 jul. 18. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3753154

Author

Fadlon, Itzik ; Lyngse, Frederik Plesner ; Nielsen, Torben Heien. / Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms. I: SSRN Electronic Journal. 2022.

Bibtex

@article{8da7989685ea4208aba123185ac97f3b,
title = "Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms",
abstract = "Do early labor market experiences determine longer-run life and career outcomes, and do they operate differentially for males and females? We study this question in the context of the physician labor market by exploiting a randomized lottery that determines the sorting of Danish physicians into internships, where students with bad lottery numbers end up assigned to less desirable local labor markets and entry-level jobs. Using administrative data that span up to ten years after physicians{\textquoteright} graduations, we study key decisions that determine their longer-run life trajectories. We find causal effects of early-career labor market sorting on a range of life-cycle outcomes that cascade from longer-run labor market sorting, to human capital accumulation, to occupational choice, and even to fertility. Notably, we find that the persistent longer-run effects are entirely driven by females, whereas males experience only temporary career disruptions from unfavorable early-stage sorting. The gender divergence is unlikely to be explained by preferences over entry-level markets, but differential family obligations, attitude toward competition, and mentorship appear to play operative roles. Our findings have implications for policies aiming at outcome-based gender equality, as they reveal how persistent gaps can arise even in an institutionally gender-neutral setting with early-stage equality of opportunity.",
author = "Itzik Fadlon and Lyngse, {Frederik Plesner} and Nielsen, {Torben Heien}",
year = "2022",
month = jul,
day = "18",
doi = "10.2139/ssrn.3753154",
language = "English",
journal = "SSRN Electronic Journal",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Causal Effects of Early Career Sorting on Labor and Marriage Market Choices: A Foundation for Gender Disparities and Norms

AU - Fadlon, Itzik

AU - Lyngse, Frederik Plesner

AU - Nielsen, Torben Heien

PY - 2022/7/18

Y1 - 2022/7/18

N2 - Do early labor market experiences determine longer-run life and career outcomes, and do they operate differentially for males and females? We study this question in the context of the physician labor market by exploiting a randomized lottery that determines the sorting of Danish physicians into internships, where students with bad lottery numbers end up assigned to less desirable local labor markets and entry-level jobs. Using administrative data that span up to ten years after physicians’ graduations, we study key decisions that determine their longer-run life trajectories. We find causal effects of early-career labor market sorting on a range of life-cycle outcomes that cascade from longer-run labor market sorting, to human capital accumulation, to occupational choice, and even to fertility. Notably, we find that the persistent longer-run effects are entirely driven by females, whereas males experience only temporary career disruptions from unfavorable early-stage sorting. The gender divergence is unlikely to be explained by preferences over entry-level markets, but differential family obligations, attitude toward competition, and mentorship appear to play operative roles. Our findings have implications for policies aiming at outcome-based gender equality, as they reveal how persistent gaps can arise even in an institutionally gender-neutral setting with early-stage equality of opportunity.

AB - Do early labor market experiences determine longer-run life and career outcomes, and do they operate differentially for males and females? We study this question in the context of the physician labor market by exploiting a randomized lottery that determines the sorting of Danish physicians into internships, where students with bad lottery numbers end up assigned to less desirable local labor markets and entry-level jobs. Using administrative data that span up to ten years after physicians’ graduations, we study key decisions that determine their longer-run life trajectories. We find causal effects of early-career labor market sorting on a range of life-cycle outcomes that cascade from longer-run labor market sorting, to human capital accumulation, to occupational choice, and even to fertility. Notably, we find that the persistent longer-run effects are entirely driven by females, whereas males experience only temporary career disruptions from unfavorable early-stage sorting. The gender divergence is unlikely to be explained by preferences over entry-level markets, but differential family obligations, attitude toward competition, and mentorship appear to play operative roles. Our findings have implications for policies aiming at outcome-based gender equality, as they reveal how persistent gaps can arise even in an institutionally gender-neutral setting with early-stage equality of opportunity.

UR - https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/799d791c-e371-338f-b3b0-76ff917332fd/

U2 - 10.2139/ssrn.3753154

DO - 10.2139/ssrn.3753154

M3 - Journal article

JO - SSRN Electronic Journal

JF - SSRN Electronic Journal

ER -

ID: 320106336